Archives For David Platt

In 2017, God allowed my wife and I to attend a conference called The SING! Conference, sponsored by Keith & Kristin Getty. It was held in Nashville, Tennessee, and the focus of the conference was to encourage pastors and music directors to engage the church to sing more for the glory of God!

We were not able to attend last year’s conference but I just recently came across a video of one of the speakers, David Platt, and wanted to share it with you. Platt said this,

God blesses his people for the sake of His praise among all people.

You and I are prone to disconnect God’s blessing in our lives from God’s purpose for our lives.

So, what is the purpose of worship? What is YOUR purpose of worship and does it match up with GOD’s purpose for worship?

Take a moment and watch the following video clip of David Platt talking about God’s purpose for worship!


Quotes from my readings banner

david-plattJust recently, my church went through David Platt’s Bible study entitled “Counter Culture”. It is an excellent study that shows how Christians should be countering our culture when faced with things like poverty, same-sex marriage, racism, immigration, abortion, pornography, and orphans.

A description of the book is as follows:

Everywhere we turn, battle lines are being drawn – traditional marriage vs. gay marriage, pro-life vs. pro-choice, personal freedom vs. governmental protection. Seemingly overnight, culture has shifted to the point where right and wrong are no longer measured by universal truth but by popular opinion. And as difficult conversations about homosexuality, abortion and religious freedom continue to inject themselves into our workplace, our churches,, our schools and our homes, Christians everywhere are asking the same question: How are we suppose to respond to all this?

David Platt (current president of the International Mission Board & former pastor at The Church at Brook Hills) tackles these subjects head-on and takes us to God’s Word for the answers. Each subject is looked at through the lens of what God says in His Word vs. what the world is saying.

Each chapter is excellent and brings out some great points but I want to focus on several quotes from the last chapter entitled “The Most Urgent Need: The Gospel & The Unreached”.

David opens the book with asking three questions that each of us must answer for ourselves.

  1. Are we going to choose comfort for the cross?
  2. Are we going to settle for maintenance or sacrifice for mission?
  3. Will our lives be marked by indecisive minds or undivided hearts?

Platt is urging the church and Christians to answer these questions. He makes the following statement:

Are we going to follow Jesus? Not, are we going to bow our heads, say a prayer, read the Bible, go to church, and give a tithe while we get on with the rest of our lives? But, are we going to follow Jesus with all our lives, no matter where He leads us to go, how countercultural the task is, or what the cost may be for us, our families, and our churches?

He goes on to talk about choosing comfort over the cross:

When we observe our churches today, do they look like groups of people who gather with one another as they give their lives to spread the gospel among unreached people, impoverished communities, abandoned orphans, lonely widows, dying babies, sex slaves, and suffering brother and sisters around the world? Sadly, I don’t believe that’s the picture we portray. Instead, we spend the majority of our time sitting as spectators in services that cater to our comforts. Even in our giving to the church, we spend the majority of our money on places for us to meet, professionals to do the ministry, and programs designed around us and our kids.

I can’t help but wonder what might happen if we put aside our personal preferences, let go or our extra biblical (and in some cases unbiblical) traditions, lay down our cultural comforts, and organize ourselves solely and sacrificially around God’s Word and gospel mission.

David Platt then talks about are we settling for maintenance or are we willing to sacrifice for the mission:

Over the course of the book, we have considered massive physical needs in the world. Yet as we contemplate these needs, if we are not careful, we run the risk of ignoring people’s most pressing need. That need is not for water, food, family, freedom, safety, or equality. As urgent as all of these things are for men, women, and children around the world, they are surpassed in urgency by a much greater need. That need – the most urgent need – is for the gospel.

The central message of the church in the world, then, is proclaiming the gospel to the world.

Jesus Christ gave us marching orders, and they are clear. Proclaim the gospel – the good news of God’s great love for us in Christ – to every people group on the planet.

Platt concludes the chapter by explaining that too many people are marked by indecisive minds. He pleads with each of us to have undivided hearts toward the work of spending the gospel to the ends of the earth.

Following Jesus doesn’t just entail sacrificial abandonment of our lives: it requires supreme affection from our hearts.

What must be consistent for all of us, however, is that we pray, give and go as He leads, and as we do, that we proclaim the gospel with conviction, compassion, and courage.

My favorite quote from this chapter and one that I hope and pray that I live out is the following:

For if the gospel is true, and if our God is worthy of the praise of all people, then we must spend our lives and mobilize our churches for the spread of Christ’s love to unreached people groups all around the world. Jesus has not given us a commission to consider; He has given us a command to obey.

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David Platt was elected International Missions Board president in August 2014. He previously served as pastor of The Church at Brook Hills in Birmingham, Alabama. David earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Georgia, followed by master’s degrees of divinity and theology and a doctorate of philosophy from New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author of Radical, Radical Together, Follow Me, and Counter Culture. David also is the founder of Radical, a ministry devoted to disseminating disciple-making resources so the gospel can be made known to the ends of the earth. *

The following are some of my favorite quotes by David Platt:

“Radical obedience to Christ is not easy… It’s not comfort, not health, not wealth, and not prosperity in this world. Radical obedience to Christ risks losing all these things. But in the end, such risk finds its reward in Christ. And he is more than enough for us.”
Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream

“Somewhere along the way we have subtly and tragically taken the costly command of Christ to go, baptize, and teach all nations and mutated it into a comfortable call for Christians to come, be baptized, and listen in one location.”

“A materialistic world will not be won to Christ by a materialistic church.”

“We are settling for a Christianity that revolves around catering to ourselves when the central message of Christianity is actually about abandoning ourselves.”                        ― Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream

“Every saved person this side of heaven owes the gospel to every lost person this side of hell.”

“Instead of imagining all the things we can accomplish, we ask God to do what only he can accomplish. Yes, we work, we plan, we organize, and we create, but we do it all while we fast, while we pray, and while we constantly confess our need for the provision of God.”

“Ultimately, tragedy on earth can only be understood rightly from the perspective of heaven.”

“When we realize we have the responsibility to teach the word, it changes everything about how we hear the Word.”

“You and I can choose to continue with business as usual in the Christian life and in the church as a whole, enjoying success based on the standards defined by the culture around us. Or we can take an honest look at the Jesus of the Bible and dare to ask what the consequences might be if we really believed him and really obeyed him.”

“The question therefore is not, “Can we find God’s will?” the question is, “Will we obey God’s will?”

“The sovereignty of God is the only foundation for worship in the midst of tragedy.”


I would love to hear your favorite quote by David Platt, so just leave it in the comment section below!

 

* David Platt’s bio was taking from the IMB website

Quotes from my readings banner

I am continuing to read from David Platt’s book “Follow Me”, and today I came across these statements:

Why are so many supposed Christians sitting on the sidelines of the church, maybe even involved in the machinery of the church, but not wholeheartedly, passionately, sacrificially, and joyfully giving their lives to making disciples of all nations? Could it be because so many people in the church have settled for superficial religion instead of supernatural regeneration?

Platt goes on to say:

If Christianity merely consists of a list of dutiful dos and don’ts on top of principles to believe and practices to observe – many of which are similar to every other religion – then we don’t have much to share with the world.

Further, if being a Christian is merely a matter of superficial religion, then no amount of persuasion will convince us that we need to step out of our comfort zones, alter our priorities, sacrifice our possessions, risk our reputations, and potentially even lose our lives to share Christ with others. We have every reason to sit back in a privatized faith that works well and doesn’t impose upon the people around us (much less around the world). A superficial approach to Christianity always results in a spectator mentality in the church.

However, if Christianity involves supernatural regeneration whereby the God of the universe reaches down his hand of mercy into the depths of our souls, forgives us of all our sin, and fills us with his Spirit, then a spectator mentality is spiritually inconceivable.

Points to Ponder:

  1. Are you living a life full of rules and obligations because you have to?
  2. Are you working on your “list”?
  3. Are you willing to “alter our priorities” to share Christ with others?
  4. Have you truly given your life to Christ and ask HIM to be Lord of all?

This past weekend, I had the privilege of being a part of “Multiply” with David Platt & Francis Chan. David Platt (author of “Radical”) and Francis Chan (author of “Crazy Love”) talked about what is missing and needed in most churches today – discipleship. The two of them have come together to shed light on this area of the church that we have not done a very good job of over the last few decades.

So what is “Multiply”? (Watch “Multiply” video)

Jesus’ command to make disciples in the Great Commission (Matt 28:18-20) was not intended solely for the early disciples, nor is disciple-making the responsibility of a special class of Christians. Rather, all followers of Christ are called to make disciples, to fish for men (Matthew 4:19). Many don’t actively make disciples because they don’t know what it means to be a disciple.

On a practical level discipleship means that we look at other people and say exactly what Jesus said to his disciples: “Follow me.” To make disciples is to intentionally show the life of Christ before others, to share the gospel of Christ with others, to teach the Word of Christ to others, and to do all of this with a view toward reaching every people group in the world with the gospel.

Our desire is to come alongside local churches by emphasizing this glorious and much-neglected aspect of our calling as followers of Christ. With Multiply we want to encourage because some are unaware of their biblical responsibility to make disciples, and we want to equip because many do not know how to make disciples.

As “Multiply” was going on, I was tweeting some great quotes by both David Platt & Francis Chan, along with other people who had some great quotes regarding discipleship. I wanted to share some of them with you:

To see more quotes, click here.